Cultúr/Scór/Culture/Scór-New Edition for 2011-

Tobar Teanga (1)

Just a few words you will easily understand without ever having studied Irish:

The English equivalent of the following words ends in
-ge (-nge/-age/-agge)

oráiste bagáiste cabáiste damáiste carráiste

coláiste morgáiste pasáiste garáiste míleáiste

The word in Irish for
word' is focal' - which can be a source of amusement. And the word for a few' is cúpla'. So, when we put the two words together we get cúpla focal'. So, hopefully you will feel that you can cope with all of the above without any great effort.

Words in use in English derived from Irish.

So long'. We use this when we are saying cheerio'. So long' comes from the Irish ‘slán'. So, slán' crept into the English language as so long'.

Placenames

Tober'. Tober- in English comes from ‘tobar' in Irish and means ‘well'. So, for example Tobermore' means big well' (in Irish the adjective comes after the noun.) Slán go fóill! - Bye for now!

Tobar Teanga (2)

If you want to travel here are a few words you might find useful when you visit your local, friendly travel agent!!!!  Can you guess what they mean?  Here is a guide (in no particular order): station, pint, air, pump, visa, airport, car, oil, litre, taxi, train, gallon, petrol, ticket, bus

aerfort                 tacsaí                   bus                        carr                       traein

ticéad                   víosa                     peitreal                ola                        stáisiún

galún                    lítear                     pionta                  pumpa                  aer                                                     

I want to introduce another phrase which is vitally important in any language - ‘please'.  We can travel the world with ‘cúpla focal' and ‘please'.  The Irish for ‘please' is ‘le do thoil' - pronounced something like ‘ le du hull'.

So, for example, if you would like a couple of tickets to go to France, simply say ‘cúpla ticéad, le do thoil'.  If you would like a taxi - ‘tacsaí, le do thoil'.  There is no need to say ‘I would like' because language is about communication - get the message across as simply as possible.  That is why ‘le do thoil' comes in so handy.  How would you say - ‘I would like a couple of pints.'

Words in use in English derived from Irish.

‘Brogue'  This word refers to a person's accent.  In Ireland we are renowned for having a ‘brogue'.  But, do we realise the derivation of the phrase. The word in Irish is ‘bróg' and means ‘shoe'.   Apparently, when the invaders came to our land our ancestors had difficulty understanding them.  So, they declared that they were speaking with a ‘shoe' in their mouth.  Other peolple believe that it was the invaders who declared that we Irish had a shoe in our mouths.  Either way, we now know another focal in the Irish language.

Placenames

Doon/Dun.  This is the Irish word ‘dún' meaning ‘fort'.  The country is full of ‘doon/dun.  Co. Down is simply ‘An Dún' - ‘The Fort'.  How many placenames with ‘Doon/Dun' can you think of?

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (3)

Carrying on with the theme of travel here are a few countries you may have visited or would intend to visit some time in the future:

an Afraic            an Araib                    an Astráil           na Bahámaí            an Bheilg

an Bhrasaíl        Camarún                   Ceanada             Cúba                         an Éigipt

an Fhrainc         an Ghearmáin           an Ghréig           an Spáinn               an Tuirc

an India             an Iodáil                    Iosrael                Meiriceá                  an Pholainn

Of course, our own country is Éire.  We find that in different forms e.g. Teilifís Éireann, Bus Éireann.


But we find it as the title of a poem written by Pádraig Mac Piarais (Patrick Pearse) called ‘Mise Éire' - (‘I am Ireland') and in the movie ‘Mise Éire' about the 1916 Rising (with music by Seán Ó Riada).


 ‘Tyr'. The word for a country is ‘tír' (prounced something like ‘cheer' in English).  And we find that in numerous placenames. 


Examples: Tír Eoghain/Tyrone -the land of Eoghan; ‘Tír na nÓg/the land of Youth; Tír Chonaill (Tyrconnell)/The land of Conall). 

Words in use in English derived from Irish

‘batter'.  ‘You're always on the batter' meaning ‘you're never at home/always on the move'.  This comes from the Irish ‘bóthar' meaning ‘road'.  So, ‘you're always on the road'.  


Placename/Logainm


‘Glen'.  Glen comes from the Irish ‘gleann' and the country is full of ‘glen' placenames.  Examples are: Gleann Sheáin/Glenshane - Shane's glen; Gleann Cholm Cille/Glencolumbkille - Comcille's glen.

Phrase

Because we have met the words ‘teanga' and ‘tír' we can put them in a much-used phrase in Irish - ‘Tír gan teanga tír gan anam'.  This means ‘a country without a language is a country without a soul.'

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (4)

Eating, of course, is an important element in living.  So, here are some words that will help you survive in a fully Gaeliscised world!

bagún        tae                 siúcra          tornapa       oinniún      cairéad

práta          borghair      banana        dinnéar        suipéar      tósta

turcaí         sicín               cabáiste      rósta           sailéad       stéig

caifé           súp                custard       kebab          barbaiciú    oráiste

So, for example, you want ‘roast chicken and potatoes,' you would say ‘sicín rósta agus prátaí, le do thoil'.  ‘Tea and toast' would be ‘tae agus tósta, le do thoil'.

Words in use in English derived from Irish

‘blether'.  ‘He's only a blether'.  This means that he talks nonsense.  It comes from the Irish ‘bleadar'.

Placename/Logainm

‘Slieve'.  This comes from the Irish ‘sliabh' meaning ‘mountain'.  Again, this is in common use throughout the country.  

Examples:  Sliabh na mBan/Slievenamon -‘ the mountain of the women'; Sliabh Dónairt/Slieve Donard - ‘Donard's mountain'.  How many more can you find?

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (5)

Other words associated with food and drink are: (most are readily recognisable.  Some, however, may be more difficult.  Can you match these with the proper Irish word? - marmalade, whisky, litre, café, kettle, pepper, rice, spoon?)


caifelann         spúnóg            cupán      citeal                 pota


rúbarb             rís                     salann     piobar               sásar


pláta                casaról            saspán     marmaláid       piorra


branda             líomanáid       caife        cóc                     fuisce


pionta              lítear                galún       punt                    mug


So, ‘cupán caife/tae, le do thoil' would get you ‘a cup of coffee/tea, please'. 

Words in use in English derived from Irish

‘Bru'.  In English many people talk about the ‘bru of the river'.  This come from the Irish ‘bruach' meaning the ‘bank (of a river)'.


Placename/Logainm


‘Owen'/-en-‘.  Many placenames have this element.  It comes from the Irish ‘abhainn' meaning ‘river'.  Examples:  ‘Bun Abhann/Benone' - ‘the foot of the river'; Bun Abhann Dalla/Cushedall' - ‘the foot of the river Dall'.

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (6)

In this section I want to list a few words relating to geographical/topographical features.  Some you have already met - but no harm!  Some may be more difficult than others to make out.  Try matching these: stone, county, hill, height.


loch           sliabh             cnoc                  abhainn        tír


contae      cloch              pláinéad           réigiún          náisiún


cósta         compás         atmaisféar     atlantach      ard 


Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Boreen'.  This word is common in country areas.  It refers to a narrow lane/road.  It is derived from the Irish ‘bóithrín/a little road'.  (We met ‘bóthar' in an earlier (Tobar Teanga (3)).  In Irish it is common to suffix ‘-ín' to a word to create the diminutive. 


Placename/Logainm


‘Knock'  This comes from the Irish ‘cnoc/hill.  It is very common in placenames throughout the country.  Example: ‘Cnoc Mhuire/Knock' - ‘Our Lady's Hill',  the shrine to Our Lady in Co. Mayo.

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (7)

In this section I want to list a few words relating to politics/government.

polaiteoir        páirtí            náisiúnaí             poblachtach


parlaimint       fóram          vóta                     vótáil


impireacht       buiséad      ambasadóir        náisiúnta  


Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Bum'.  ‘He's only a bum' is a common expression describing someone who is a brag/boaster.  It comes from the Irish ‘bumaireacht/bragging/bumming'.

Placename/Logainm


 ‘Lough'  This comes from the Irish ‘loch/lake'.  It is very common in placenames throughout the country. 


Examples: Loch nEathach/Lough Neagh - ‘Eochú's Lake'; Loch an Oileáin/Loughinisland - ‘The lake of the island'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (8)

In this section I want to list a few words relating to religion.  There may be a couple you will not readily recognise.  Try and match them: priest, bishop.

séipéal           Pápa             ministir       cairdinéal        caitliceach                   protastúnach


scrioptúr        raibí              seirbhís       an Bíobla      Anglacánach              preispitéireach


sacraimint     págánach    Íosa             Críost              Léigiún Mhuire salm       parabal


Moslamach     críostaí      deoise           easpag           sagart                                altóir

I have included the word for ‘bishop' and ‘priest' because they are in common usage and because you already know them - indirectly.  The surname ‘Taggart' and ‘McAnespie' come from Irish ‘Mac an tSagairt/son of the priest' and ‘Mac an Easpaig/son of the bishop'. 

Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Call'.  ‘You had no call to do that is a common expression in English.  The word ‘call' is Irish meaning ‘need'. 


Placename/Logainm


 ‘Clough/Cloy  This comes from the Irish ‘cloch/stone'.  It is very common in placenames throughout the country.  


Examples: ‘ Cloch an Mhuilinn/Cloughmills - the millstone; Achadh na Cloiche/Aughnacloy - the field of the stone'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (9)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to books/learning.  I have included a language which may not be immediately recognisable.  Find - ‘English'

  
matamaitic     graf                 fisic               Gaeilge       Fraincis                     scoil


cúrsa                diplóma           mapa            ceimic         teicneolaíocht       staidéar


marc                micreascóp     institiúid      grád              cultúr                     atlas


coláiste           seiminéar      peann            acadamh     critéar                    critic


Gearmáinis     Iodáilis         Spáinnis         Seapáinis    Sínis                        Béarla 
Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Cap'.  ‘Cap the cows' is a common expression in Ireland.  It comes from the Irish ‘ceap' meaning to ‘block pathof/stop/catch'.


Placename/Logainm


 ‘Muck'  This comes from the Irish ‘muc/pig'. 

Examples:  ‘An Mhucais/Muckish - the pig back/ridge'. Mucros/Muckross - pig promontory'.

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (10)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to sport. 


camógaíocht       rugbaí       sacar               cruicéad     haca           dairteanna


galf                        snúcar      traenáil           captaen      cártaí         club


spórt                      cic             rás                    scil              trófaí          scátáil


sciáil                      púl             Oilimpeach     mionúr       sinsear       maratón


júdó                       karaté     billéardaí         campáil      canú            campa


Words associated with Gaelic games are not so easily recognisable.


They are:

Peil Ghaelach - Gaelic Football
Iománaíocht - Hurling
Liathóid Láimhe - Handball
Cluiche Corr - Rounders 
   
Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Clabbar'.  ‘in clabbar to the knees' is a common expression in Ireland.  It comes from the Irish ‘clábar' meaning to ‘mud.


Placename/Logainm


 ‘Bo/Boe'  This comes from the Irish ‘bó/cow'. 


Examples:  ‘Droim Sean-bhó/Drumshanbo - ridge of the old cow';  ‘Ard Bó/the cow's height'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (11)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to entertainment.  Some words may not be readily recognisable: banjo, fiction, stage, banjo, reel, circus, uillinn pipes.


raidió             teilifís            páipéar               banna             céilí            dioscó


bodhrán        druma           giotár                  pianó               fidil            píb uilleann


seisiún           grúpa             bainseó             fliúit                  sorcas      vióla


veidhlín          sascafón       ríl                        feis                   ficsean     carúl


biongó            véarsa           fleá                      cláirnéid         dráma      stáitse   

Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Clattar'.  ‘I fell a clattar' meaing ‘I fell with an awful bang'.  It comes from the Irish ‘cliotar' meaning ‘blow'.


Placename/Logainm


 ‘Tarf'  This comes from the Irish ‘tarbh/bull'. 
Example: ‘Cluain Tarbh/Clontarf - pasture of bull'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (12)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to measurement. 


unsa                   gram                cileagram         méadar    pionta


míle                   ciliméadar        galún                  lítear       tonna


milleagram      milliméadar     milliún                 billiún    ceinteagrád   


Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Clitter Clattar'.  ‘You should hear the clitter clatter of her coming up the aisle.'  This comes directly from the Irish ‘cliotar cleatar' meaning ‘racket/din'.


Placename/Logainm


‘vad(d)y/maddy'  This comes from the Irish ‘madadh/dog'. 


Examples:  Léim an Mhadaidh/Limavady - the dog's leap';  Gleann an Mhadaidh/Glenamaddy - the glen of the dog'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (13)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to correspondence.  Some words may not be so easily recognisable. 

Examples: letter, log off, log on, postcode, column. 


litir               cárta             stampa             foirm              dáta                nóta


bróisiúr         fón              fón póca             faics              paimfléad      doiciméad


colún             catalóg       postchód           log ann          log as             cóip 

      
Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Colleen.  We have all heard of the ‘Irish colleen'.  This comes from the Irish ‘cailín/girl'.


Placenames


‘Augh'  This comes from the Irish ‘each/horse'. 


Examples:  ‘Eachroim/Aughrim' - ridge of horses'.  ‘Eachinis/Aughinis - horse island'.


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (14)


In this section I want to list a few words relating to health/hygiene.  Some words may not be so easily recognisable. 

Examples:  psyschologist, vaccine, hospital, water, towel.


sópa               tuaille              uisce             pian          piolla           dochtúir


an fliú             ospidéal          siampú        matrún     tobac           veasailín


víreas              vitimín             vacsaín       púdar        síceolaí       druga       

Words in use in English derived from Irish


‘Crew'.  Many of us have heard of the ‘pig crew' meaning ‘piggery'.  This comes from the Irish ‘cró' meaning ‘pen/fold for pigs'.

Placenames


‘Cat'  This comes from the Irish ‘cat/cat'. 


Examples:  ‘Caiseal Cat/Castlecat - stone ring-fort of (wild) cats. ‘Cloch Mhachaire Cat/Cloghmagheracat - stone (castle) of the plain of cats' (the old name of Clough in Co. Down).


Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (15)

In this section I want to list a few words relating to the weather. 

stoirm                   tornadó                                hairicín                 gusta                    

gála                        ózón

Words regularly used in terms of weather but not easily recognisable:

= day

fliuch = wet

fuar = cold

deas = nice

Words in use in English derived from Irish

‘Cuddy.  This is used in a fairly derogatory sense - ‘sure, he's nothing but a cuddy.' This comes from the Irish ‘codaí' meaning ‘idler/indolent'.

Placename/Logainm

‘Mo/May/Moy'.  This comes from the Irish ‘má (maigh)/plain'. 

Examples:  an Mhaigh/The Moy - the plain'.  Maigh Eo/Mayo - the plain of the yews'.  ‘Maigh gCaiseal/Moygashel - the plain of the stone ring-fort'. ‘Má Bhile/Moville - the plain of the sacred tree'. 

Slán go fóill.

Tobar Teanga (16)

In this section I want to list a few words relating to the time.  A couple of words that may not be so easily recognisable: minute, hour.

maidin                  clog                        soicind                 uair                        nóiméad             

am

A nice phrase dealing with time is ‘ó am go ham/from time to time'.                                                    

Words in use in English derived from Irish

‘Dull'.  I have often heard this used when referring to putting a knot on a rope. This comes from the Irish ‘dol' meaning ‘loop/snare'.

Placename/Logainm

‘Magher(a)'.  This comes from the Irish ‘machaire/plain'. 

Examples:  ‘Machare Rátha/Maghera - the plain of the fort'. ‘Machaire Beag/Magherabeg - the small plain'.

Slán go fóill.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 


 

 



 




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